It is World Thyroid Day

May 25, 2018

Woman thyroid gland controlMay 25th is World Thyroid Day. Thyroid function is central to so many different systems and functions in the body from metabolism, to mood, to inflammation and hormone balance, to immune system function.

Here are some interesting facts that you may not know about thyroid function:

  • Some of the physical signs of low thyroid function (hypothyroidism) are: Puffy physical appearance with swollen face and bags under the eyes, overweight, dry, rough, brittle hair and nails, thinning of the outside third of the eyebrows, and diffuse hair loss.
  • Proper thyroid hormone replacement therapy can be one of the best antidepressants available, bringing energy and an improved mood.
  • Thyroid hormones support detoxification within and in between the over 30 trillion cells in your body.
  • Avoid high protein meals at night if you have low thyroid function as it slows down the conversion of T4 to the active T3 hormone.

When properly balanced and supported, your thyroid gland can help you live a healthier and happier life.  I recommend getting properly tested and treated by a doctor who is skilled in looking beyond the standard blood tests and prescription of T4 and can offer you a broader look at what is happening and how to best treat it.

In health,

Dr. Gina

 


Join us Tonight for a Live Continuing Medical Education Webinar with Dr. Gina Nick

March 13, 2018

The effect of nutrition and lifestyle on cognitive processes has long been studied. Dr. Gina will be covering newly described influences of key brain nutrients and lifestyle factors on cognitive function that provide neuronal protection and improve brain metabolism.

The presentation will be delivered live from 6:30 to 8:30 PM Pacific time tonight.

Click below for more information.

http://www.calnd.org/nw19

Hope to “see” you there!


Simple, Affordable Way to Cure Depression

March 25, 2014

fruits_and_vegetablesAn article, published in the Washington Post yesterday, speaks to a simple, naturopathic approach to addressing depression symptoms in many people.  It also offers further evidence for the Sickness Syndrome Depression phenomenon I have been speaking about for the past ten years..making the connection between inflammation, diet, the gut and mental illnesses like depression.  Tomorrow evening at 6:30 PM is our next Purification/Detox kickoff. I will be discussing this 21 day program that lowers inflammation, balances gut microflora, and applies diet principles that are  effective in treating depression.

In health,

Dr. Gina


Toxic Chemical Exposure Linked with Depression

July 31, 2013

child_picking_strawberriesA new study in France led by Harvard School of Health professor Marc Weisskopf found that farmers who used weedkillers were more than twice as likely to be treated for depression than farmers who didn’t use the chemicals.

Weedkillers are toxic and trigger inflammation in the body that can trigger a matching inflammatory response in the brain that leads to depression and other mental illness. This is referred to as Sickness Syndrome Depression, a term coined years ago when I was seeing the connection in  research and in practice.  The good news is we have the tools to address this and many other known causes of depression (hint: an antidepressant medication deficiency (e.g. Prozac)  is generally not the cause) and relieve people of years of unnecessary suffering.

Read more about the study here.

Also, please take a look at the post from yesterday regarding a bill in Hawaii that, if passed, will hopefully protect the islands and the people there from unnecessary exposure to toxic weedkillers.

In health,

Dr. Gina


Step #1: Exercise!

April 30, 2013

RunningNatureHere is a link to a great article highlighting the benefits of exercise, especially outdoor exercise,  as an inexpensive, readily accessible remedy for anxiety, insomnia, back pain, and more.

In health,

Dr. Gina


Yoga for Depression and Anxiety

April 15, 2013

Yoga Pic 2A new article in the Los Angeles Times helps to shed light on the value of yoga as part of a treatment plan for anxiety and depression.

In health,

Dr. Gina

Los Angeles Times (latimes.com) – Yoga Might Help Boost Mental Health – By Amber Dance – (Saturday, April 13, 2013)

As you stretch into warrior pose and inhale and exhale, you’re not just stretching those hamstrings and lungs; you’re also doing good for your brain with a practice that can stave off or relieve problems such as stress, depression and anxiety.

Yoga “gives some sense of sanity,” says Sat Bir Khalsa, a neuroscientist at Harvard Medical School in Boston. “You’re no longer washed away by the avalanche of your emotions. You are more in control.”
Yoga practice can also lower heart rate, breathing rate and blood pressure, and may make people less sensitive to pain.

In some cases – particularly for anxiety, depression and stress – yoga might be more effective than medication, though this hasn’t been proved, says Dr. Murali Doraiswamy of the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. While it won’t get rid of whatever is causing you distress, it could make it easier for you to deal with the issues. Doraiswamy compares learning yoga to learning to surf: Once you’ve got the skills, you can ride the wave instead of drowning underneath it.


Tryptophan to Protein Ratio is Key for Boosting Serotonin

April 11, 2013

Just like with hormones, it is about balance when it comes to amino acid therapy.  Depression_Woman

The relative amount of one amino acid, like tryptophan, to the others, is what makes the difference when it comes to mental health.  Dr. Michael Greger, MD of NutritionFacts.org posted an interesting video about the importance of high tryptophan levels, relative to other amino acids, when it comes to boosting serotonin levels and treating depression.  So eating animal protein, for example, isn’t helpful for boosting serotonin, whereas consuming seeds (pumpkin, sesame, butternut squash, etc), which have a particularly beneficial tryptophan to protein ratio, is helpful. I would advise eating raw (and sprouted if possible) seeds, as roasting the seeds alters the amino acid ratios.

We have long been testing the blood for amino acid imbalances in patients with mood disorders. Formulating the appropriate amino acid blend to create healthy amino acid balance, based on symptoms and the blood test results,  makes a big difference in producing positive change.  The most impressive changes I have witnessed in practice are with patients facing the challenges of anxiety, depression and autism disorders.

In health,

Dr. Gina


%d bloggers like this: