Protecting the Brain with Hormone Pellet Therapy

April 12, 2016

0031Nearly seven years ago I wrote a blog post about using turmeric and vitamin D3 to prevent Alzheimer’s. Today there is even more research pointing to this simple and affordable treatment.

One of the main benefits is the role these two natural medicines play in lowering inflammation in the body, that triggers damage to the brain.

Today, I would also emphasize the value of treating hormone deficiencies with pellet therapy (SottoPelle® Therapy) to further lower inflammation that triggers damage in the brain, especially when there is a history of Traumatic Brain Injury that causes a chronic inflammatory process to ensue that leads to depression, anxiety, symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), drug addiction and relapse.

In health,

Dr. G


New Office ~ New Treatments

March 3, 2016

We are excited to announce that HealthBridge Newport is officially open and welcoming  patients at our new and permanent address 20072 Birch St Suite 240 Newport Beach, CA 92660. Office phone number remains the same 949-715-9321. In addition to offering the full suite of integrative medical services you are accustomed to, we are now the exclusive provider of SottoPelle Therapy in Newport Beach. Stay tuned for details on our grand opening!

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HealthBridge Newport


IV Therapy

November 17, 2015

Intravenous Therapy at HealthBridge

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Are you ready to jump start your health, and let go of the toxicity that’s weighing you down? Here’s an amazing new way to get your vitamins, and discover the power in A NEW WAY TO AGE.

When you’re seriously ill, your digestive system may lack the energy to absorb and transport nutrients. Also, our ability to fully absorb and metabolize nutrients through digestion decreases as we age. Luckily, Intravenous (IV) therapy can help. IV therapy safely delivers high levels of vitamins and minerals directly into your blood stream through a vein in your arm or hand. One of the main advantages of IV therapy over oral vitamins is that the nutrients bypass the digestive tract, so they’re totally absorbed, providing higher concentrations and remarkable health benefits.

IV therapy can contain minerals, amino acids, glutathione, and popular vitamins like B and C. Combining various vitamins and detoxifying agents has been shown to boost blood flow, help maintain vital organ function, increase cellular energy production, and more. These positive effects can enhance your endurance, make you feel stronger, help your memory, reduce symptoms of stress and can even improve skin quality and help you look your best.

What Symptoms May Be Helped by IV Therapy?

IV therapy may help alleviate many symptoms of illness and diseases, including: the common cold, immune system issues, PMS, asthma, diabetes, hepatitis, hypertension, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and other prolonged illnesses.

At HealthBridge we customize IV formulas based on your initial intake and blood test results and have one of our IV nurses visit patients at home to administer the therapy in comfort.   Call or email our office anytime for more information on this amazing adjunct treatment that supports optimal health and helps to prevent disease.

In health,

Dr. Gina

 


Detoxification

November 3, 2015

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Did you know that environmental toxins may be taking a toll on your health? Learn how to power up against the pollutants and feel vital and healthy again. Detox and discover A NEW WAY TO AGE.

Detoxification is the metabolic process of purging toxic substances from the body. Our bodies have an excellent natural detoxification system that cleanses impurities which cause damage and disease. The three main organs involved include the liver, which prevents toxic substances from entering our blood stream, the colon, which flushes out toxic chemicals, and the kidneys, which filter away unwanted substances.

Unfortunately, we are being bombarded by environmental toxins, and our detoxification system may be getting overloaded. The list of pollutants, chemicals, and toxins we take in daily is endless, from fertilizers, and antibiotics, to processed foods filled with additives, preservatives and artificial ingredients. We’re constantly exposed to heavy metals and environmental estrogens from pesticides and other chemicals. Once inside our bodies, these substances are not easily broken down. When our detoxification system is inundated by far more pollutants than we can eliminate, toxicity can occur.

What are The Symptoms of Toxicity?

You may be familiar with the symptoms of toxicity, which include headaches, muscle pain, fatigue, skin rashes, and digestive problems. Environmental exposure may possibly be connected to a wide variety of diseases and chronic illnesses, such as asthma, allergies, arthritis, digestive disorders, autism, multiple sclerosis, lung disease, and breast and other cancers.

Fortunately, there’s help. There are several detox methods that may support and enhance your body’s own system. Detoxification therapies include IV Chelation Therapy, probiotics, massage therapy, sauna therapy, and herbal medicine, as well as vitamin and mineral supplements. Of course, exercise, nutrition, and a healthy diet also play a major role in the detox process.

21 Day Purification Program Discussion at True Food

Join us for an intimate dinner and discussion next Thursday November 12th, 2015 at True Food Kitchen, Fashion Island from 6:30-9:30 PM to learn more about detoxification and the 21 Day Medical Purification Program.

Click here for details and to register.

In health,

Dr. Gina


Large-scale Veterans Affairs study reaffirms safety and benefits of testosterone replacement, in men.

October 15, 2015

A US Veterans Affairs database study of more than 83,000 male subjects found that men whose low testosterone was restored to normal through gels, patches, or injections had a lower risk of heart attack, stroke, or death from any cause, versus similar men who were not treated. Rajat Barua and colleagues analyzed data collected on 83,010 male veterans with documented low total testosterone levels, dividing them into three clinical groups: those who were treated to the point where their total testosterone levels returned to normal (Group 1); those who were treated but without reaching normal (Group 2); and those who were untreated and remained at low levels (Group 3). Importantly, all three groups were “propensity matched” so the comparisons would be between men with similar health profiles. The researchers took into account a wide array of factors that might affect cardiovascular and overall risk. The average follow-up across the groups ranged from 4.6 to 6.2 years. The sharpest contrast emerged between Group 1 (those who were treated and attained normal levels) and Group 3 (those whose low testosterone went untreated). The treated men were 56% less likely to die during the follow-up period, 24%less likely to suffer a heart attack, and 36%less likely to have a stroke. The differences between Group 1 and Group 2 (those who were treated but did not attain normal levels) were similar but less pronounced. The study authors conclude that: “normalization of [total testosterone] levels after [testosterone replacement therapy] was associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality, [myocardial infarction], and stroke.”
Sharma R, Oni OA, Gupta K, Chen G, Sharma M, Dawn B, Sharma R, Parashara D, Savin VJ, Ambrose JA, Barua RS. “Normalization of testosterone level is associated with reduced incidence of myocardial infarction and mortality in men.” Eur Heart J. 2015 Aug 6. pii: ehv346.

In health,

Dr. Gina


How to Read Food Labels

October 6, 2015

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When you are cruising the grocery store aisles, you probably flip over a few items to scrutinize their nutrition labels. But do you understand what you’re looking at? The government is working on updating the label to reflect today’s nutritional concerns and include more realistic serving sizes, but until that happens, use the diagram included with this post to help make quick, informed food choices that contribute to a healthy, balanced diet. Also, remember these helpful tips:

1. Nutrition information is provided for one serving of a food or beverage. Many products contain more than one serving. If a serving size is one cup, and you eat two cups, then you must double the calories, fat, sugar, and other ingredients to get an accurate estimate of how much you’ve eaten. If you’ve eaten a smaller portion than what is on the label, calculate accordingly.

2. Pay special attention to the amount of sugars (including carbohydrates) in one serving. This is especially important if you have diabetes (or other health concerns) that require you to monitor sugar intake or the glycemic index of foods.

3. Check out the amount of fat, especially saturated fat, in one serving. Unhealthy fats contribute to many chronic health problems. Trans fats are also labeled because they are known to contribute to bad cholesterol,which contributes to heart disease. They also harden arteries and block cell to cell communication. Choose foods that are free of these fats. Trans fats are also referred to as “hydrogenated oil” or “partially hydrogenated oil” and are detrimental to your health. However, some foods, like nuts, have high fat content, but the source of fat is actually good for the body. It is not a saturated or a trans fat.

4. Be aware that “0” does not mean zero! It means less than 5% per serving!

5. In addition to understanding the nutrition label, take a look at the list of ingredients.
If you cannot pronounce the words that are listed on a food label, it’s likely coming from chemicals and processed (unnatural) elements that are not healthy for the body. Some of the items you want to avoid include:

  • Preservatives including BHA, BHT, brominated products
  • GMO – genetically modified organisms, common in corn and soy derivatives
  • Dextrose
  • Xanthan gum
  • Hydrocarbons (pesticides PCB, DDE, DDT)
  • Soy and cottonseed oil
  • Dyes (e.g., yellow dye no. 5, tartrazine)
  • MSG – monosodium glutamate (common in canned foods and Asian cooking)
  • Food allergens – if you or family members have a known allergy to peanuts, wheat, soy, or gluten

If you are in a hurry and can’t take the time to read labels, be sure to avoid packaged (bag, box, or bottle) foods. Instead, buy fresh foods and eat a rainbow everyday (e.g., fruits, veggies, nuts, seeds, cheese, yogurt). Also, choose water, tea, or juices with no sugar added.

Finally, pay attention to what’s happening in the news – in July 2015 the government proposed a new nutrition information panel for food labeling. The public is invited to provide comment: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm387533.htm

In health,

Dr. Gina

Diagram_Nutrition_Label


The Many Health Benefits of Being in Nature

September 24, 2015

Here’s a great article about the benefits of spending time in nature.

In health,

Dr. Gina

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Being In Nature Benefits Health-But How?

September 23, 2015 | by Stephen Luntz

Photo credit: In his essay, Walking, Thoreau said: "In wildness is the preservation of the world." The same might go for our health. Credit: SNEHIT/Shutterstoclk

Photo credit: In his essay, Walking, Thoreau said: “In wildness is the preservation of the world.” The same might go for our health. Credit: SNEHIT/Shutterstock

Time spent close to nature is good for our health, numerous studies have shown. What is much harder to establish, however, is how and why this occurs. Now a paper claims the immune system may be the primary pathway through which exposure to the natural world can lead to a wide array of health benefits.

Modern medicine and plumbing – which brings us clean water and removes our waste – have doubled our lifespans, but technology sometimes comes with a cost to our health. It seems urban living is part of that, with research linking lack of access to the open air and relatively pristine environments to an astonishing range of conditions from depression and ADHD to cancer. The effect nature is thought to have on us has earned the name Biophilia. Now a paper attributing these diverse benefits to the immune system has been published in Frontiers of Psychology.

Ming Kuo of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, isn’t jumping to conclusions. As the author of some of the papers indicating these benefits herself, she uses the review article to propose 21 pathways that might connect time in nature with better health.

“While each is likely to contribute to nature’s impacts on health to some degree and under some circumstances, this paper explores the possibility of a central pathway by proposing criteria for identifying such a pathway and illustrating their use,” Kuo writes. “A particular pathway is more likely to be central if it can account for the size of nature’s impacts on health, account for nature’s specific health outcomes, and subsume other pathways.”

Her conclusion is that “enhanced immune functioning emerges as one promising candidate for a central pathway between nature and health. There may be others.”

“Nature doesn’t just have one or two active ingredients. It’s more like a multivitamin that provides us with all sorts of the nutrients we need. That’s how nature can protect us from all these different kinds of diseases – cardiovascular, respiratory, mental health, musculoskeletal, etc. – simultaneously,” Kuo said in a statement.

Kuo suggests that fresh air, sunlight and a beautiful view relax us and turn off our “fight or flight” responses. “When we feel completely safe, our body devotes resources to long-term investments that lead to good health outcomes – growing, reproducing, and building the immune system,” she said. If so, many of the same benefits can be achieved for those who really aren’t the outdoor type by doing what they love, be it reading a good book or spending time with friends. However, Kuo adds these don’t provide elements of good health such as Vitamin D.

Some of Kuo’s previous work has looked at the ways cities can be redesigned to maximize the health benefits provided by relatively natural environments, even if provided in the limited format of urban parks or community gardens. A better understanding of the mechanisms might help us understand how to fit nature into our busy lifestyles, if that is not too much of a contradiction. Still, we hope you’re reading this on a mobile device in a forest or at the beach.


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